Posts for: April, 2014

By John G. Rutland & Kenneth L. Vandervoort, Jr Family & Cosmetic Dentistry
April 17, 2014
Category: Oral Health
TVDesignerNateBerkusIsThankfulforChildhoodPreventiveDentalTreatments

Prior to his first appearance on the Oprah Winfrey show, interior designer Nate Berkus knew immediately that he was not there to pick sofa colors and paint chips. Instead, he was there to lift people up through the way they live. And boy, did he do just that. Over the next eight years, Berkus completed 127 makeovers and became one of America's most beloved go-to guys for inspiration on the latest design trends.

During a recent interview with Dear Doctor magazine, Nate discussed his career as well as his oral healthcare. He credits his dazzling all-natural smile — no cosmetic dentistry here — to the treatments he received as a child from his dentist. “I'm grateful for having been given fluoride treatments and sealants as a child.” He then added that, “healthy habits should start at a young age.” Nate is still in the habit of brushing his teeth two or three times a day. As for flossing his teeth, he credits his dentist with the advice he still follows: “Floss the ones you want to keep.”

Many parents and caregivers may not be aware of the important role fluoride treatments play in protecting children's teeth. Fluoride has the unique ability to strengthen tooth enamel, the hardest substance found in nature. Depending on where you live, you may have fluoridated tap water. You may also have fluoride in your toothpaste, depending on the brand you use. Both of these are beneficial, but sometimes we recommend additional fluoride treatments based on the specific needs of your children. Why? The concentrations of the topical fluorides we typically apply are much higher than what is found in toothpastes, and we apply them for a longer period of time. For example, we often apply them for four minutes per treatment session.

To learn more about fluoride treatments, contact us today to schedule an appointment so that we can conduct a thorough examination, discuss any questions you have as well as what treatment options will be best for you or your child. Or to learn more about fluoride treatments now, you can continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Topical Fluoride.” And to read the entire interview with Nate Berkus, please see the Dear Doctor magazine article “Nate Berkus.”


By John G. Rutland & Kenneth L. Vandervoort, Jr Family & Cosmetic Dentistry
April 02, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
ConsideringBoneandGumsCriticaltoAchievingaBetterSmileWithImplants

You may be considering dental implants for a lot of reasons: durability, functionality and imperviousness to decay. But perhaps the winning reason is how they will make you look — their life-like quality can restore a smile marred by missing or disfigured teeth. Achieving that result, though, requires your dental team to determine beforehand the state of your bone and gums, and treat any conditions that would interfere with the final result.

The first area to look at is the amount of bone available to support the implant. An adequate amount is necessary not only to stabilize the implant, but to also ensure proper placement needed to achieve the best “smile” result. Your specialist, then, will take steps to protect available bone during procedures, or even aid in building up the bone structure by inserting grafting materials that encourage new bone growth.

The degree of bone volume in adjacent natural teeth is also important because it can greatly affect the health of the papillae. This is the triangular-shaped gum tissue that occurs between each tooth that gives normal teeth their arched appearance. Insufficient bone in these areas could cause the papillae not to regenerate properly around the implant site, which creates unsightly dark spaces in the gum tissue known as “black hole disease.”

We must next consider the quality and health of your gum tissue. Patients whose gum tissue tends to be thin face difficulties during cosmetic surgical procedures; their thinner tissues are also more prone for objects behind them to be visible, including metal or other crown materials.

Our aim is an implant crown emerging from the surrounding gum tissue just as a natural tooth would. To achieve this requires knowing first what we have to work with regarding your bone and gums, and to address any issues that are problematic. One aid in this process is to affix a temporary “prototype” crown on the implant to wear while the permanent crown is manufactured. This allows you to “test-drive” the new look, and make adjustments in the final product regarding color and materials.

Accounting for all these factors — and then making adjustments along the way — will help ensure the final crown meets your expectations for function and appearance.

If you would like more information on the fabrication of implant crowns, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Matching Teeth & Implants.”